Several years ago I set up a Twitter account for the purposes of promoting my books and this blog. At that time, Twitter was kind of lame, and my quote about it was “Twitter is God’s way of telling you you have too much time on your hands.”

Twitter has changed much, now with videos and more features. I downloaded the app onto my phone a few weeks ago and now I am officially addicted. Just when I think I am out, my phone alarm rings and I have to see who liked my tweet, or made a nasty remark, or who followed me. The secret is to follow everybody who says something funny, or does something interesting. Then it’s fun.

I followed someone new today on Twitter, a Laura Loomer, who rushed the stage to disrupt an adaptation of Julius Caesar in Central Park, in which President Donald Trump replaces Caesar and gets stabbed and so forth. I haven’t seen it, but killing Trump on stage is the obvious money shot. This is the only part anyone seems to talk about or object to.

Anyway, Laura Loomer got arrested. Her gripe is that with the recent spate of Leftist violence and political assassination, this type of inflammatory play should at least get disrupted, or protested. Whether she is correct or not does not interest me much. Central Park is a public park. If it were a private forum you bought tickets for, then yes, I could see how she was depriving people of their right to purchased goods and services. I suppose what she did was rude. Rudeness is wrong, no?

Shakespeare was an amazing writer, long dead and out of copyright. Talentless hacks glom on to his work and pawn it off as their own by time shifting Donald Trump into the role of Caesar. They are “clickbaiting” their audience, how indescribably rude of them. The plot of Caesar is not something to pound a Trump hit piece onto as a template. Who was Julius Caesar? A lifelong politician who conquered and raided other nations and brought the loot home, along with cultural artifacts, such as the Julian Calendar. He was a priest in some Roman secretive cults. He was an insider, born into political power, who became a very successful and ruthless general. He got greedy and the entrenched powers conspired to subvert those loyal to him into a conspiracy to murder him. It was an inside job. His friends did it.

After Caesar died, Antony read his will, and it was all about how Caesar was distributing his wealth to the masses into the form of public parks and other largess. This socialist move inspired the commoners to go after the assassins. Now, one of the issues Trump is taken to task for is he wants to reduce the inheritance tax. He wants his money to go to his children, not the masses. Trump is not Caesar.

Trump is an outsider. Compare him to a Visigoth or a Vandal who sensed the entrenched Roman weakness and capitalized on it. The Establishment better internalize this–Trump’s people are not polite Roman Legions at the gate, pressuring you to make our guy Emperor.  We are the angry and dispossessed citizens of the now defunct Republic, we are “We The People.”  We are trying to bring the Republic back. Before the Left continues to incite to violence, better take a long, cold, hard look in the mirror and see exactly who it is who is trying to topple the process. Who is Caesar here?

Laura Loomer is the prophet in your midst, telling you to “Beware the Ides of March”. She is not warning Trump, she is warning you. Former Attorney General Loretta Lynch was right, it takes blood in the streets to defend the principles of The Founders. She was dead wrong, however, about who it was who supported The Constitution. She betrayed her high office. It may take the blood of a corrupt Establishment to rid us of the yoke of its dictatorship. We’d rather do it peacefully, but if the Left wants violence, as it obviously does, better take that look in the mirror, and ask that Commie Pinko you see staring at you to change he/she’s ways.

One deep pocket partnership” That has been my question for years. Why hasn’t Andy been able to make this happen? BIEL’s potential has been touted for years yet Andy default business model is to print more shares. This in-house approach to running BIEL has made the Whalens money and some flippers but not long term shareholders. The window of opportunity for BIEL to make a major move is not going to remain open much longer. We need a credible spokesperson to put a face to the product and a national ad campaign. IMHO

Worth repeating,

Click on the link for free book

Lyme and Punishment: Lost in the Labyrinth of Misdiagnosed Lyme Disease by [Carr, M.S.]

Lyme and Punishment: Lost in the Labyrinth of Misdiagnosed Lyme Disease centers on the story of a once-healthy man. This middle-aged professional had always been a physically tough, reticent man. An outdoorsman, he loves spending time in the dense fortress of pine and birch behind his family home. He’d grown up exploring these woods; in time, he’d lead his own sons on expeditions and teach them how to bushwhack hiking trails, how to find the strongest vine for swinging, how to stick together when night was coming in. Deer ran in herds through the trees; hawks swooped in on prey. Occasionally, a black bear stumbled down to forage food from the trash cans beside his house. But for this strong, healthy man, the most dangerous creature in the woods turned out to be an insect no bigger than a grain of pepper.

He never noticed the bite of a blacklegged tick. He couldn’t, however, however, ignore the increasingly agonizing repercussions to his body. Dozens of medical specialists ran tests, scanned notes, and suggested the symptoms were “in his head.” None of these doctors ran the right test. Unaware, the man was up against what all misdiagnosed Lyme sufferers face: an out-dated medical protocol (as of this writing nearly set in stone) that treats each one as though he or she were Patient Zero in the Lyme disease epidemic.

This is a book about failure, both the patient’s and the medical establishment’s, raising the questions of whether either deserves compassion or, in the end, to be cured at all. All Lyme victims are random. All must have pondered these questions endlessly. The author certainly did. The present answer is emphatically negative.

This book describes the first hand experiences of one of the early sufferers from this modern day plague. It details the journey through misdiagnosis, and provides some hindsight on how the situation could have been handled better so people with Lyme Disease or who think they have it might identify and act accordingly. It lists some of the pitfalls of misdiagnosis in a very personal way.

The author’s mission, in describing his individual struggle and how he copes with his condition, is to provide a service for other wrongly diagnosed Lyme sufferers and to shed light on the current minimization by the medical establishment’s of the disease’s often wide-ranging symptomatology. Too many Americans will recognize themselves in this short account. Too many others will recognize family members and friends.

 

Hello readers,

Below is the book people with Lyme Disease need to read for the straight facts from someone who lived it. If you have Lyme, think you do, or know somebody who might, please share this post so others can get a book about this epidemic.

 

Lyme and Punishment: Lost in the Labyrinth of Misdiagnosed Lyme Disease by [Carr, M.S.]

Lyme and Punishment: Lost in the Labyrinth of Misdiagnosed Lyme Disease centers on the story of a once-healthy man. This middle-aged professional had always been a physically tough, reticent man. An outdoorsman, he loves spending time in the dense fortress of pine and birch behind his family home. He’d grown up exploring these woods; in time, he’d lead his own sons on expeditions and teach them how to bushwhack hiking trails, how to find the strongest vine for swinging, how to stick together when night was coming in. Deer ran in herds through the trees; hawks swooped in on prey. Occasionally, a black bear stumbled down to forage food from the trash cans beside the his house. But for this strong, healthy man, the most dangerous creature in the woods turned out to be an insect no bigger than a grain of pepper.

He never noticed the bite of a blacklegged tick. He couldn’t, however, however, ignore the increasingly agonizing repercussions to his body. Dozens of medical specialists ran tests, scanned notes, and suggested the symptoms were “in his head.” None of these doctors ran the right test. Unaware, the man was up against what all misdiagnosed Lyme sufferers face: an out-dated medical protocol (as of this writing nearly set in stone) that treats each one as though he or she were Patient Zero in the Lyme disease epidemic.

This is a book about failure, both the patient’s and the medical establishment’s, raising the questions of whether either deserves compassion or, in the end, to be cured at all. All Lyme victims are random. All must have pondered these questions endlessly. The author certainly did. The present answer is emphatically negative.

This book describes the first hand experiences of one of the early sufferers from this modern day plague. It details the journey through misdiagnosis, and provides some hindsight on how the situation could have been handled better so people with Lyme Disease or who think they have it might identify and act accordingly. It lists some of the pitfalls of misdiagnosis in a very personal way.

The author’s mission, in describing his individual struggle and how he copes with his condition, is to provide a service for other wrongly diagnosed Lyme sufferers and to shed light on the current minimization by the medical establishment’s of the disease’s often wide-ranging symptomatology. Too many Americans will recognize themselves in this short account. Too many others will recognize family members and friends.

 

 

Hello readers,

Below is the book people with Lyme Disease need to read for the straight facts from someone who lived it. If you have Lyme, think you do, or know somebody who might, please share this post so others can get a book about this epidemic.

 

Lyme and Punishment: Lost in the Labyrinth of Misdiagnosed Lyme Disease by [Carr, M.S.]

Lyme and Punishment: Lost in the Labyrinth of Misdiagnosed Lyme Disease centers on the story of a once-healthy man. This middle-aged professional had always been a physically tough, reticent man. An outdoorsman, he loves spending time in the dense fortress of pine and birch behind his family home. He’d grown up exploring these woods; in time, he’d lead his own sons on expeditions and teach them how to bushwhack hiking trails, how to find the strongest vine for swinging, how to stick together when night was coming in. Deer ran in herds through the trees; hawks swooped in on prey. Occasionally, a black bear stumbled down to forage food from the trash cans beside the his house. But for this strong, healthy man, the most dangerous creature in the woods turned out to be an insect no bigger than a grain of pepper.

He never noticed the bite of a blacklegged tick. He couldn’t, however, however, ignore the increasingly agonizing repercussions to his body. Dozens of medical specialists ran tests, scanned notes, and suggested the symptoms were “in his head.” None of these doctors ran the right test. Unaware, the man was up against what all misdiagnosed Lyme sufferers face: an out-dated medical protocol (as of this writing nearly set in stone) that treats each one as though he or she were Patient Zero in the Lyme disease epidemic.

This is a book about failure, both the patient’s and the medical establishment’s, raising the questions of whether either deserves compassion or, in the end, to be cured at all. All Lyme victims are random. All must have pondered these questions endlessly. The author certainly did. The present answer is emphatically negative.

This book describes the first hand experiences of one of the early sufferers from this modern day plague. It details the journey through misdiagnosis, and provides some hindsight on how the situation could have been handled better so people with Lyme Disease or who think they have it might identify and act accordingly. It lists some of the pitfalls of misdiagnosis in a very personal way.

The author’s mission, in describing his individual struggle and how he copes with his condition, is to provide a service for other wrongly diagnosed Lyme sufferers and to shed light on the current minimization by the medical establishment’s of the disease’s often wide-ranging symptomatology. Too many Americans will recognize themselves in this short account. Too many others will recognize family members and friends.

 

Mundus Media Ink– Thanks to Michelle Goodhew for formatting and designing my paperback book cover. Awesome and beautiful lady!

PJ BOOK (1)

Due to some circumstances, I won’t be able to make my annual pilgrimage to my great-grandfather’s and namesakes’ grave this Memorial Day. A superabundance of relatives leaves me bereft of guilt. Somebody will attend my family’s spirits this day. At some point in the future, this may no longer be true, but by then I will be one of the spirits being attended to, most likely.

My grandfather performed an illegal stomach surgery under sniper fire during World War Two, saving the lives of two young men who were bleeding to death internally due to gunshot wounds. I say illegal surgery because doctors weren’t supposed to perform such surgeries in the field. One of the men was a German soldier, a Nazi, I suppose. The Army gave him a Silver Star for it. It was an action you either gave a medal for or a court-martial. They should have given him the Congressional Medal of Honor for it. Here is the story, told through the eyes of one of the assistants. I told an acquaintance about this once, and he went through the usual brainwashed bullshit about the Germans deserving to die. I would not associate with this person, but I forgive his ignorance now. Propaganda is a powerful tool. I don’t feel the need to explain or justify, the actions speak for itself. Doctors used to take an oath.  Now they harvest aborted baby organ parts for pin money. What the hell happened?

I haven’t posted anything in a while, though I have been reading the news somewhat.  Here are some random impressions about events and people.

Ann Coulter-political columnist, writer, and general media personality. She seems to have adopted Ron Paul’s brand on non-interventionism. This is a positive sign. At crunch time, though, when the real damage was being done, she was a straight-up Neocon. Ultimately, being Irish American and descended from coal miners, I can’t get past the fact her father was a Pinkerton detective. I am somewhat sympathetic to her, and genuinely think she is treated infamously by the Hard Leftists. Just not sure she is not playing some deep game. She endorsed Hillary once, though I can’t say I voted for Romney. I was sort of a Ron Paul Bro’ (the smarter and earlier version of the Bernie Bro’.) Mittens treated Ron badly. It came out Ron Paul made a side deal with the GOP in which he wouldn’t run Third Party if they let him in the debates. Not quite honest with his supporters, though he did pave a way for Trump. Ironic really, since Ron Paul was a Never Trumper. Ironic really. I give Dr. Paul a pass because he was supporting his son, he of the odd hair piece who I am actually starting to like, Rand Paul. “A poor thing, but my own”, as they say. Rand may eventually be President, though. I would vote for him, though I do think Trump will be a two termer.

Kim Dot.Com-the immigrant to New Zealand from West Germany seems like someone who sprang from the fevered pitches of my nightmares, or like the German kid from The Simpsons. He says he has some info about the Seth Rich murder. Seth Rich is destined for greatness on The Clinton Death List. Lyndon Johnson went along with whacking JFK in broad daylight while he was sitting by his wife with a Senator in the same car. The Democrats play rough. Seth should have been swept under the rug better, but Hillary made two mistakes-First, she lost the election. Nothing succeeds like success, and nothing fails like failure. It is in the vested interest of the Democrat Party and possible presidential contenders in 2020 to destroy Clinton and her machine, but as surgically as possible. Seth Rich might be the best way to accomplish this. Hillary doesn’t have the juice to kill this investigation anymore, and the nature of political murder is the number of degrees of association must be limited. In other words, not too many buffers between the decider and the shooter.

Hillary’s second mistake was in blaming Russia too enthusiastically for her failure as a candidate. Her lackluster support of Jill Stein’s recount effort indicated her voter fraud was probably massive, and she didn’t want the records examined too in-depthly. Blaming Russia for the dump to Wikileaks made exposing Seth Rich’s role in all this more of a necessity for the GOP. Seth Rich debunks the Russian story.

(About Russian Intervention-aside for the fact the USA has been messing with Russian and Ukrainian elections, I assume the Russians did meddle, based on this: Every other foreign country that mattered meddled. Mexico meddled. Carlos Slim bought New York Times and meddled. The nation of Amazon bought the Washington Post and meddled. The Pope took a tour of the USA and meddled as head of the tiny and heavily fortressed nation called The Vatican City. China meddled with money, at the very least. Israel meddled. EU meddled. I mean, Russia must have done something, just nobody knows what.  Who dumped the emails to Wikileaks? Seth Rich.)

I am really starting to resent the Democrat Party Rulers. I should be a Democrat. My whole family used to be Democrat. We are not real Republicans, though many of us vote that way now. The Republicans are bogged down in similar quagmires. Seth Rich wore strange but patriotic clothing, and wrapped his beer bottles in patriotic bunting, but aside from this, the Internet Party idea of his is actually pretty good. The political disconnect now is people who actually know how to use the Internet and get their news from it, and everyone else. Seth Rich would not be the first murdered Jewish martyr to start a political movement.

Bioelectronics Corporation: Not getting in to the grassy knoll on this thing today, but may as well mention some things. BIEL needs to learn to value the phrase “Underpromise but Overdeliver“.  The supposed key to their success is to get a general pain approval from the FDA, rather than the specialized body parts approval up to now, which I believe consists of the ankle, knee, and eye area. If they get the back pain approval, then the theory is the FDA will grudgingly acknowledge that the Actipatch can be used for pain in general, huzzah, and this will make the Patch a new kind of safe Ibuprofen.

This hinges, I think, on the successful completion of an Oxford University study. God only knows when this will happen, or how long the post analysis will take them (Give the data to me, I will take vacation and get it done in a week, probably better than they could, given previous studies. The Oxford crowd is probably several cuts above the previous studies though, in which they could not make an accurate chart. I made some charts to compensate, and I notice BIEL seems to be using my chart format now. Smart move. This still does not explain to my satisfaction how BIEL got two approvals and no significant traction. They seemed as unprepared for it as their shareholders. Not good.)

BIEL marketing is in general pretty lame. Nobody cares about how it works, just will it help my booboo. They should get a partner or sell out. This isn’t a hobby, get in the game.

For instance, they got an order from TESCO. Genuinely big news, but it must be an insignificant amount. How do I know? BIEL issues a press release when they sign a new distributor in Guatemala (not joking). I think $19.99, the cost of an Actipatch, is several times the average yearly income there. If TESCO bought a million units, the share price would reflect. It does not.

Having said all that, BIEL has behaved with great tenacity against what seemed like insurmountable odds. They should not be in this situation. They have been treated unfairly by the FDA, and have long been under seige by some really vicious predatory vultures, people who short  sub-penny startups into oblivion and then buy the best assets on a firesale. One of them is a moderator on the BIEL IHUB board. He actually snitched to the SEC about them and brags about it, and also is trying to get the FDA to reverse its recent approvals.  I never want to know its home address.

now

 

PJ BOOK (1)

 

Cover design by Michelle Goodhew.