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Lyme and Punishment: Lost in the Labyrinth of Misdiagnosed Lyme Disease: a personal experience, free now!

 

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Hello Friends,

I recently spoke with the upper management of Bioelectronics Corporation, who as always have been responsive and informative. I rarely call them. Anyway, they are working behind the scenes, be assured of that. Possible partnerships on the horizon, nothing which has not been publicly discussed, but it was good to hear they are still in the game firsthand.

This post is about two items in particular. As the CIA might put it, I have a limited hangout here, nothing earthshattering. However, I want to present some ideas which, if cultivated by a grassroots of #Actipatch supporters, presence on Social Media, in particular Twitter, will be increased significantly.

Two items are pasted below. I will address each in turn. The first, a post on the I-hub Bioelectronic message board about getting more out of Twitter. DewmBoom posts “Tweet for fighting the Opioids Epidemic, Using Actipatch”

DewmBoom, though well-intentioned, should have phrased this thusly:

“Tweet for fighting the #OpioidsEpidemic, Using #Actipatch”

The difference? Hashtags(#) are what demarcate subjects on Twitter. #s are basically the coding signal Twitter uses to categorize “meta” words. I know this from my sub-career as a book promoter. Without the #, you are mainly invisible on Twitter.

https://ritetag.com/best-hashtags-for/backpain I googled twitter pain relief hashatags: Open source, easy access info, and all that is necessary to get a lot more mileage out of Twitter posting is to add two popular hashtags to your post

Screenshot 2017-08-11 at 11.08.15 AM

 

Screenshot 2017-08-11 at 10.48.47 AM

So, for prospective Twitter users, use #ActiPatch as a central locale on Twitter, but also add another one designed for the topic of the post. Don’t use more than two hashtags, you look like a spammer or a bot.

Case in point. Here is a Tweet from the Bioelectronics Corporation (Actipatch)

It’s a lovely site, a lot going on, but some issues we need to discuss. I will use the post below as an example.

 

Screenshot 2017-08-11 at 10.47.01 AM.png

This post has no hashtags. It uses the word “Paresthesia”, which is from Ancient Greek and basically means that “pins and needles” sensation you get sometimes. Let me play the near perfect score in the verbal section of the SAT card here. If I had to look that up, others had to as well. Problems is you have to get it done in 300 characters. Even #Paresthesia would have been better. Doctors might follow that hashtag.  Also, this is probably about reducing #MenstrualPain using the #Actipatch. Billion dollar industry and I need to say “probably”?

I found this by putting “pins and needles hashtag on Twitter”into Google search

Screenshot 2017-08-11 at 11.23.24 AM.png

 

found this by putting “paresthesia hashtag on Twitter” into Google search. They are out there, but we need to start adding hashtag to the best metawords in the post.

I promised there would be nothing earthshattering, didn’t I?

Screenshot 2017-08-11 at 11.25.30 AM.png

 

People love this product, and there is a lot of interest in reducing opioid addiction, helping people relieve pain safely, and being truly socially responsible. Incrementally, with baby steps, we could get this boulder rolling downhill and let it assume a life of its own through social media.

So whats the first step? At least start using #Actipatch. This will help organize people on Twitter. After that, the best hashtags will reveal themselves. I have been tweeting President Trump and even First Lady Melania whenever either tweets about the opioid crisis, which apparently started the day Trump was inaugurated, testing it. Like, retweet, reply #Actipatch. I will follow anyone who uses #Actipatch in a Tweet, and so should everyone else.

frodo

 

giphy (2)

One deep pocket partnership” That has been my question for years. Why hasn’t Andy been able to make this happen? BIEL’s potential has been touted for years yet Andy default business model is to print more shares. This in-house approach to running BIEL has made the Whalens money and some flippers but not long term shareholders. The window of opportunity for BIEL to make a major move is not going to remain open much longer. We need a credible spokesperson to put a face to the product and a national ad campaign. IMHO

Worth repeating,

Click on the link for free book

Lyme and Punishment: Lost in the Labyrinth of Misdiagnosed Lyme Disease by [Carr, M.S.]

Lyme and Punishment: Lost in the Labyrinth of Misdiagnosed Lyme Disease centers on the story of a once-healthy man. This middle-aged professional had always been a physically tough, reticent man. An outdoorsman, he loves spending time in the dense fortress of pine and birch behind his family home. He’d grown up exploring these woods; in time, he’d lead his own sons on expeditions and teach them how to bushwhack hiking trails, how to find the strongest vine for swinging, how to stick together when night was coming in. Deer ran in herds through the trees; hawks swooped in on prey. Occasionally, a black bear stumbled down to forage food from the trash cans beside his house. But for this strong, healthy man, the most dangerous creature in the woods turned out to be an insect no bigger than a grain of pepper.

He never noticed the bite of a blacklegged tick. He couldn’t, however, however, ignore the increasingly agonizing repercussions to his body. Dozens of medical specialists ran tests, scanned notes, and suggested the symptoms were “in his head.” None of these doctors ran the right test. Unaware, the man was up against what all misdiagnosed Lyme sufferers face: an out-dated medical protocol (as of this writing nearly set in stone) that treats each one as though he or she were Patient Zero in the Lyme disease epidemic.

This is a book about failure, both the patient’s and the medical establishment’s, raising the questions of whether either deserves compassion or, in the end, to be cured at all. All Lyme victims are random. All must have pondered these questions endlessly. The author certainly did. The present answer is emphatically negative.

This book describes the first hand experiences of one of the early sufferers from this modern day plague. It details the journey through misdiagnosis, and provides some hindsight on how the situation could have been handled better so people with Lyme Disease or who think they have it might identify and act accordingly. It lists some of the pitfalls of misdiagnosis in a very personal way.

The author’s mission, in describing his individual struggle and how he copes with his condition, is to provide a service for other wrongly diagnosed Lyme sufferers and to shed light on the current minimization by the medical establishment’s of the disease’s often wide-ranging symptomatology. Too many Americans will recognize themselves in this short account. Too many others will recognize family members and friends.

 

Hello readers,

Below is the book people with Lyme Disease need to read for the straight facts from someone who lived it. If you have Lyme, think you do, or know somebody who might, please share this post so others can get a book about this epidemic.

 

Lyme and Punishment: Lost in the Labyrinth of Misdiagnosed Lyme Disease by [Carr, M.S.]

Lyme and Punishment: Lost in the Labyrinth of Misdiagnosed Lyme Disease centers on the story of a once-healthy man. This middle-aged professional had always been a physically tough, reticent man. An outdoorsman, he loves spending time in the dense fortress of pine and birch behind his family home. He’d grown up exploring these woods; in time, he’d lead his own sons on expeditions and teach them how to bushwhack hiking trails, how to find the strongest vine for swinging, how to stick together when night was coming in. Deer ran in herds through the trees; hawks swooped in on prey. Occasionally, a black bear stumbled down to forage food from the trash cans beside the his house. But for this strong, healthy man, the most dangerous creature in the woods turned out to be an insect no bigger than a grain of pepper.

He never noticed the bite of a blacklegged tick. He couldn’t, however, however, ignore the increasingly agonizing repercussions to his body. Dozens of medical specialists ran tests, scanned notes, and suggested the symptoms were “in his head.” None of these doctors ran the right test. Unaware, the man was up against what all misdiagnosed Lyme sufferers face: an out-dated medical protocol (as of this writing nearly set in stone) that treats each one as though he or she were Patient Zero in the Lyme disease epidemic.

This is a book about failure, both the patient’s and the medical establishment’s, raising the questions of whether either deserves compassion or, in the end, to be cured at all. All Lyme victims are random. All must have pondered these questions endlessly. The author certainly did. The present answer is emphatically negative.

This book describes the first hand experiences of one of the early sufferers from this modern day plague. It details the journey through misdiagnosis, and provides some hindsight on how the situation could have been handled better so people with Lyme Disease or who think they have it might identify and act accordingly. It lists some of the pitfalls of misdiagnosis in a very personal way.

The author’s mission, in describing his individual struggle and how he copes with his condition, is to provide a service for other wrongly diagnosed Lyme sufferers and to shed light on the current minimization by the medical establishment’s of the disease’s often wide-ranging symptomatology. Too many Americans will recognize themselves in this short account. Too many others will recognize family members and friends.

 

 

Hello readers,

Below is the book people with Lyme Disease need to read for the straight facts from someone who lived it. If you have Lyme, think you do, or know somebody who might, please share this post so others can get a book about this epidemic.

 

Lyme and Punishment: Lost in the Labyrinth of Misdiagnosed Lyme Disease by [Carr, M.S.]

Lyme and Punishment: Lost in the Labyrinth of Misdiagnosed Lyme Disease centers on the story of a once-healthy man. This middle-aged professional had always been a physically tough, reticent man. An outdoorsman, he loves spending time in the dense fortress of pine and birch behind his family home. He’d grown up exploring these woods; in time, he’d lead his own sons on expeditions and teach them how to bushwhack hiking trails, how to find the strongest vine for swinging, how to stick together when night was coming in. Deer ran in herds through the trees; hawks swooped in on prey. Occasionally, a black bear stumbled down to forage food from the trash cans beside the his house. But for this strong, healthy man, the most dangerous creature in the woods turned out to be an insect no bigger than a grain of pepper.

He never noticed the bite of a blacklegged tick. He couldn’t, however, however, ignore the increasingly agonizing repercussions to his body. Dozens of medical specialists ran tests, scanned notes, and suggested the symptoms were “in his head.” None of these doctors ran the right test. Unaware, the man was up against what all misdiagnosed Lyme sufferers face: an out-dated medical protocol (as of this writing nearly set in stone) that treats each one as though he or she were Patient Zero in the Lyme disease epidemic.

This is a book about failure, both the patient’s and the medical establishment’s, raising the questions of whether either deserves compassion or, in the end, to be cured at all. All Lyme victims are random. All must have pondered these questions endlessly. The author certainly did. The present answer is emphatically negative.

This book describes the first hand experiences of one of the early sufferers from this modern day plague. It details the journey through misdiagnosis, and provides some hindsight on how the situation could have been handled better so people with Lyme Disease or who think they have it might identify and act accordingly. It lists some of the pitfalls of misdiagnosis in a very personal way.

The author’s mission, in describing his individual struggle and how he copes with his condition, is to provide a service for other wrongly diagnosed Lyme sufferers and to shed light on the current minimization by the medical establishment’s of the disease’s often wide-ranging symptomatology. Too many Americans will recognize themselves in this short account. Too many others will recognize family members and friends.