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Lyme and Punishment: Lost in the Labyrinth of Misdiagnosed Lyme Disease by [Carr, M.S.]

Lyme and Punishment: Lost in the Labyrinth of Misdiagnosed Lyme Disease centers on the story of a once-healthy man. This middle-aged professional had always been a physically tough, reticent man. An outdoorsman, he loves spending time in the dense fortress of pine and birch behind his family home. He’d grown up exploring these woods; in time, he’d lead his own sons on expeditions and teach them how to bushwhack hiking trails, how to find the strongest vine for swinging, how to stick together when night was coming in. Deer ran in herds through the trees; hawks swooped in on prey. Occasionally, a black bear stumbled down to forage food from the trash cans beside his house. But for this strong, healthy man, the most dangerous creature in the woods turned out to be an insect no bigger than a grain of pepper.

He never noticed the bite of a blacklegged tick. He couldn’t, however, however, ignore the increasingly agonizing repercussions to his body. Dozens of medical specialists ran tests, scanned notes, and suggested the symptoms were “in his head.” None of these doctors ran the right test. Unaware, the man was up against what all misdiagnosed Lyme sufferers face: an out-dated medical protocol (as of this writing nearly set in stone) that treats each one as though he or she were Patient Zero in the Lyme disease epidemic.

This is a book about failure, both the patient’s and the medical establishment’s, raising the questions of whether either deserves compassion or, in the end, to be cured at all. All Lyme victims are random. All must have pondered these questions endlessly. The author certainly did. The present answer is emphatically negative.

This book describes the first hand experiences of one of the early sufferers from this modern day plague. It details the journey through misdiagnosis, and provides some hindsight on how the situation could have been handled better so people with Lyme Disease or who think they have it might identify and act accordingly. It lists some of the pitfalls of misdiagnosis in a very personal way.

The author’s mission, in describing his individual struggle and how he copes with his condition, is to provide a service for other wrongly diagnosed Lyme sufferers and to shed light on the current minimization by the medical establishment’s of the disease’s often wide-ranging symptomatology. Too many Americans will recognize themselves in this short account. Too many others will recognize family members and friends.

 

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Hello readers,

Below is the book people with Lyme Disease need to read for the straight facts from someone who lived it. If you have Lyme, think you do, or know somebody who might, please share this post so others can get a book about this epidemic.

 

Lyme and Punishment: Lost in the Labyrinth of Misdiagnosed Lyme Disease by [Carr, M.S.]

Lyme and Punishment: Lost in the Labyrinth of Misdiagnosed Lyme Disease centers on the story of a once-healthy man. This middle-aged professional had always been a physically tough, reticent man. An outdoorsman, he loves spending time in the dense fortress of pine and birch behind his family home. He’d grown up exploring these woods; in time, he’d lead his own sons on expeditions and teach them how to bushwhack hiking trails, how to find the strongest vine for swinging, how to stick together when night was coming in. Deer ran in herds through the trees; hawks swooped in on prey. Occasionally, a black bear stumbled down to forage food from the trash cans beside the his house. But for this strong, healthy man, the most dangerous creature in the woods turned out to be an insect no bigger than a grain of pepper.

He never noticed the bite of a blacklegged tick. He couldn’t, however, however, ignore the increasingly agonizing repercussions to his body. Dozens of medical specialists ran tests, scanned notes, and suggested the symptoms were “in his head.” None of these doctors ran the right test. Unaware, the man was up against what all misdiagnosed Lyme sufferers face: an out-dated medical protocol (as of this writing nearly set in stone) that treats each one as though he or she were Patient Zero in the Lyme disease epidemic.

This is a book about failure, both the patient’s and the medical establishment’s, raising the questions of whether either deserves compassion or, in the end, to be cured at all. All Lyme victims are random. All must have pondered these questions endlessly. The author certainly did. The present answer is emphatically negative.

This book describes the first hand experiences of one of the early sufferers from this modern day plague. It details the journey through misdiagnosis, and provides some hindsight on how the situation could have been handled better so people with Lyme Disease or who think they have it might identify and act accordingly. It lists some of the pitfalls of misdiagnosis in a very personal way.

The author’s mission, in describing his individual struggle and how he copes with his condition, is to provide a service for other wrongly diagnosed Lyme sufferers and to shed light on the current minimization by the medical establishment’s of the disease’s often wide-ranging symptomatology. Too many Americans will recognize themselves in this short account. Too many others will recognize family members and friends.